Saint Mary's

Catholic Primary School, Congleton

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Healthy Living

Healthy Living 2016

 

 

Year 3 learn more about Healthy Eating, Farm to Fork, 2016

Saint Mary’s Catholic Primary is an eco-school, with three Green Flags awarded from KBT Eco-schools scheme.  We are currently awaiting an assessor from Eco-schools to assess us for our fourth Green Flag.  We aim to incorporate sustainability into the curriculum whenever possible. 

One of the eco topics is healthy living, featuring nutrition and exercise.

This year Years 2 and 6 have studied healthy eating and have produced a wonderful healthy plate of food display for everyone to enjoy. 

 

Year 3 were invited to participate in Tesco’s ‘Farm to Fork’ trail at our local store we were delighted to accept.   Farm to fork is a nationwide initiative dedicated to getting children interested in where their food comes from.

The children, accompanied by their class teacher and parent helpers, spent half a day at the store.  They were split into two groups, put on their special aprons and spent time in the classroom and the store. The children had several sheets to fill in as they found out new facts during their visit.

First the children had to design a healthy plate of food.  The plate should have five food groups with lots of fruit and vegetables (33%), carbohydrates (33%). protein (12%), dairy fats (15%) and finally food and drink high in sugar (7%).  The children were asked how many portions of fruit and vegetables they should have per day.  Almost everyone answered five.  It is important to eat different coloured foods, as they supply the variety of vital vitamins and minerals to help us have healthy hearts, bones and eyes.

Fruit and vegetable Challenge The children discussed the difference between fruit and vegetables and that not everything can be grown in the UK, as some need a different climate (e.g. hotter, sunnier, cooler, wetter). Out in the produce department, they had to find fruit and vegetables from four different colour groups: red, purple, yellow/orange and green.  Did they know the difference between a fruit and a vegetable?  Clue: fruits have seeds, so tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers are all fruits.

 

Sugar in cereals Challenge  The children were asked if they knew where sugar comes from.  In hot countries it is grown as sugarcane.  In cooler countries like the UK, sugar is processed from sugar beet.  They were asked to consider how many sugar cubes they could consume each day and be healthy.  The answer was six cubes maximum.  Adults recommended daily allowance of sugar is 90g.  Then they were presented with a number of popular foodstuffs and asked to guess how many sugar cubes they each contained.  The answers may surprise you.  Can of coke (330 ml) had 7 cubes; a 220g bag of popcorn had 11 cubes; 100g bag of Haribo had 9 cubes and a 500ml bottle of Ribena had 10 cubes equivalent.

 

The children were asked to choose four different breakfast cereals and put them in order of most to least sugar content.  Out in the store the children had to look up on the cereal packets the amount of sugar per100g.  The most popular, Cocopops had 35g carbohydrates as sugar/100g portion, with Wheetos and Cheerios (24g & 21g/100g) next; finally Shreddies 14.9g/100g, Cornflakes 8.3g/100g.  The final part of the Farm to fork session involved the children making their own muesli back in the classroom.

Saint Mary’s extend their thanks to the staff at Tesco’s as the children had a super time and enjoyed the ‘fruit & veg’ and sugar challenges.  They learnt lots of interesting facts about food and where it comes from. 

 

Miss Steele, class teacher said, “This Farm to fork session has complemented our lessons and the children will remember all the fun food facts they learnt at the store.”

Mrs Patti Pinto, the school’s eco link governor said, “It is great to be able to have this learning opportunity almost on our doorstep, as we walked across to the store, instead of needing to hire a coach.  So we didn’t add to our carbon footprint as we travelled to this store.”  

Picture 1 Designing a Healthy plate in the classroom
Picture 2 Designing a Healthy plate in the classroom
Picture 3 Fruit & veg challenge
Picture 4 Fruit & veg challenge
Picture 5 Sugar challenge
Picture 6 Sugar challenge

Farm to Fork 2015

Saint Mary’s Catholic Primary is an eco-school, with three Green Flags awarded from KBT Eco-schools scheme.  As we work towards our fourth Green Flag, we aim to incorporate sustainability into the curriculum whenever possible. One of the eco topics is healthy living, featuring nutrition and exercise.

This year Years 4 and 5 have been studying cooking and nutrition.  When we were invited to participate in Tesco’s ‘Farm to Fork’ trail at our local store we were delighted.   Farm to fork is a nationwide initiative dedicated to getting children interested in where their food comes from.

 

Both classes, accompanied by their class teacher and parent helpers, each spent half a day at the store.  They were split into two groups, put on their special aprons and spent time in the bakery, warehouse and in-store in the produce department, fish counter and on the till. The children had several sheets to fill in as they found out new facts during their visit.

 

In the warehouse they learnt about food storage and were able to see what types of food were chilled or kept frozen.   n the bakery, they donned white hats and saw where doughnuts and cookies and bread were made.  They saw the big mixers in action, the different types of oven for loaves, rolls and French bread and the stages of bread-making from ingredients through proving, baking and packing.  They learnt that Congleton’s store makes 150 loaves and 500 rolls each day. 

All the children had a go on a till, scanning some items and printing off the receipt.

In the produce department, the children discussed the difference between fruit and vegetables and that not everything can be grown in the UK, as some need a different climate (e.g. hotter, sunnier, cooler, wetter). They were then tasked with finding fruit and vegetables from four different countries. They found this information on the labels.  The children were able to see many different types of fish on the chilled fish counter.

 

The final part of the Farm to fork trail involved tasting and identifying a variety of fruits, cheeses and breads.  All the children enjoyed the kiwi, pineapple, plum and melon.  The three breads were easy to ID -  tiger, Mediterranean olive and cheese bread.  The four cheeses were more difficult.  Most liked the cheddar, Edam and Cheshire, but few identified or liked the Red Leicester with mango chutney.

Saint Mary’s extend their thanks to the staff at Tesco’s (Jason, Lynn and Michelle) as the children had a super time and learnt lots of interesting facts about food, where it comes from, how it is stored and how it is processed. 

 

Mrs Patti Pinto, the school’s eco link governor said, “It is great to be able to have this learning opportunity almost on our doorstep, as we walked across to the store, instead of needing to hire a coach.  So we didn’t add to our carbon footprint as we travelled to this store.”   

Picture 1 Bakery facts
Picture 2 All about bread
Picture 3 In the cold room
Picture 4 Too cold to stay long in the freezer!
Picture 5 All about fish
Picture 6 Tasting bread
Picture 7 Concentration is required at the till
Picture 8 Concentration is required at the till

Healthy Living

Exercise: The school continues to send pupils to weekly swimming lessons (they walk to the local baths); a variety of after school sports is available for pupils to attend 

These clubs include football, multi sports, cricket.

Diet: We offer healthy school meals using the School Food Company (many items organic, local produce, fair-trade)

St Mary’s holds the Healthy Schools Award

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